Top 10 Most Ancient Bridges That Are Still In Use Today

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There are beautiful bridges available in this world and most of us think that they are due to the advancement of modern architecture. However, there are ancient bridges available that the ancient people have built. One would guess that these are no more in use as they are of ancient technology. But, on the contrary, they are ancient bridges available that people use still today.

Top 10 Most Ancient Bridges That Are Still In Use Today

Pons Fabricius

The Pons Fabricius is the oldest Roman Bridge in the city, built in 62 BCE. There are two expansive curves holding up the bridge and a littler progressively beautifying curve in the column where the two curves compromise. It extends from the eastern side of the Tiber to the Tiber Island in the waterway.

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Ponte Vecchio

Built in 1345 is situated in Florence, Italy. It is the only bridge in Florence which survived World War 2 as other bridges were destroyed by the soldiers. The bridge has an ancient sundial, looking south, is made out of a white marble cup separated by slim sections demonstrating the authoritative hours.

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Ponte Di Rialto

Ponte Di Rialto is a stone arch bridge over a grand canal in Venice, Italy. It has a 7-meter arch to permit galleys beneath just as enough solidarity to hold up the line of shops that traverses its inside. The advancement and significance of the Rialto market on the eastern bank expanded traffic on the floating bridge, so it was supplanted by a wooden bridge.

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Khaju Bridge

Khaju Bridge is one of the finest bridges in Iran built in the year 1650. This bridge is decorated with imaginative tile work and remarkable compositions. There is a structure in the focal point of the structure that King Abbas has once sat on and admired the view. This bridge also functions as a place for public meetings.

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Shaharah Bridge

Shaharah Bridge, also known as Bridge of Sighs is situated in Yemen. It was built in 17th century. Shaharah Bridge is a way that traverses a 200-meter-profound (650 ft) canyon so as to interface two mountains, Jabal al Emir and Jabal al Faish. The bridge was made to better connect the villages on both mountains to save time and effort. It was made to fight against Turkish invaders. It is a scary  bridge and a popular tourist attraction.

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Cendere Bridge

Cendere Bridge, also known as Severan Bridge, was built in Turkey during the 2nd century by four Kommagenean cities. Its goal was to respect the Roman ruler Septimius Severus, his wife Julia, and their two sons Caracalla and Geta. On each side, there are two sections that were worked to speak to the individuals from the emperor’s family.

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Anji Bridge

Anji Bridge, also known as Zhaozhou Bridge, is the oldest bridge in China built in 605 AD.  It rises 7.3m (24 ft) over the waterway and is 3m (10 ft) wide. At each end, smaller curves transmit the heap of the deck down to the fundamental curve along these lines diminishing the all out weight of the extension.  It has remained intact through many wars, floods, earthquakes and still in use today.

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Ponte Sant Angelo

Ponte Sant Angelo is a Roman Bridge in Rome built in 134 AD by the Roman Emperor Hadrian. The extension is looked with travertine marble and ranges the Tiber with five curves, three of which are Roman. The scaffold is presently exclusively person on foot and gives a beautiful perspective on Castel Sant’ Angelo.

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Tarr Steps

Tarr steps, also known as Clapper Bridge, is made entirely out of rocks resting atop of one another. The Tarr Steps is a clapper connect over the River Barle in the Exmoor National Park, Somerset, England. They are situated in a national nature save about 2.5 miles (4 km) south-east of Withypool and 4 miles (6 km) north-west of Dulverton.

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Arkadiko Bridge

The Arkadiko Bridge was worked somewhere in the range of 1300 and 1190 BCE, making it one of the most seasoned still-utilized curve scaffolds still in presence. It was based on a street that connected Tiryns to Epidaurus and was a piece of a bigger military street framework. The antiquated scaffold is as yet alright for person on foot use. Archaeologists have inferred that dependent on the extension’s style, it was assembled explicitly for chariots. It extends 72 feet long, 18 feet wide, and 13 feet tall.

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